Curator’s Picks

Did You Miss These?

Here are some of our favorite pieces for this edition of “Curator’s Picks”. All three of these images are gorgeously done with a floral theme just in time for spring. They are definitely worth a second look! First up, is “The Empress” by Kevin Jay Stanton. It’s a beautiful ink and acrylic piece that part of the artist’ Botanica series (which reimagines The Tarot as plants and herbs). Then be sure to check out “Study 37” by Tran Nguyen. Tran paints with a delicate touch to create emotive and textured experimental portraits. And our third Curator’s Pick is by Ashly Lovett. Her recent drawing “Peony” is a spectacular use of chalk pastel that is developing a spectacular color palette and style that is all her own.
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The Empress

by Kevin Jay Stanton

An Ancient Flower

The Empress embodies Mother Nature. It is a card of powerful creativity and fertility, and of the magic in the world we live in. The Magnolia is one of the Earth’s oldest flowers and as a result of continental drift it is spread across almost every corner of the world. Its glamorous blooms and sweet fragrance have inspired many cultures for centuries.

(From Botanica, my series of paintings for an upcoming tarot deck featuring magical herbs and plants)

6x8x.5″ on wood

ink, acrylic

$200 $200

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Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






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Peony

by Ashly Lovett

Chapter 2: The Garden of Live Flowers – Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

“Alice was so astonished that she could not speak for a minute: it quite seemed to take her breath away. ”

Read morePeony

$350 $350

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No interest for 6 months.
Just click Paypal Credit on the cart page.

Out of stock

www.odera.net
www.patreon.com/odera

Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






RECENT WORK

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Curator’s Picks

Did You Miss These?

We have had another exceptional month at EDO with lots of new members on our mailing list and lots of new collectors picking up great pieces. Here are some more of our favorite pieces from the past few weeks, three pieces that are definitely worth a second look! First, be sure to check out a fiery new oil painting from David Palumbo. Next up we have a mixed media drawing by Randy Gallegos, along with process footage below. And last but not least, we have a magical painting from Elliot Lang featuring wizardry and travel.

And if you want to make sure you don’t miss anything, sign up for our mailing list!

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Phoenix

by David Palumbo

6×8 inches
Oil on Panel

$500 $500

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No interest for 6 months.
Just click Paypal Credit on the cart page.

Out of stock

www.odera.net
www.patreon.com/odera

Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






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Glossai Pyros

by Randy Gallegos

A study in my Glossai Pyros series of paintings.

See a time-lapse of the creation of this piece here

$175 $175

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No interest for 6 months.
Just click Paypal Credit on the cart page.

Out of stock

www.odera.net
www.patreon.com/odera

Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






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Entrance

by Elliot Lang

Entrance is an original 8×10″ oil painting on illustration board, framed.

$425 $425

EDO now offers installment plans.
No interest for 6 months.
Just click Paypal Credit on the cart page.

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www.odera.net
www.patreon.com/odera

Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






RECENT WORK

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Curator’s Picks

Did You Miss These?

We have had another exceptional month at EDO with lots of new members on our mailing list and lots of new collectors picking up great pieces. Here are some more of our favorite pieces from the past few weeks, three pieces that are definitely worth a second look! First, be sure to check out a new oil painting from Ryan Pancoast, which is a portrait study with video and process footage as well. Next up is a beautiful mixed media painting, by the ever experimental Scott Fischer. And last but not least, we have a mixed media drawing by Daria Theodora entitled “Magnolia”.

And if you want to make sure you don’t miss anything, sign up for our mailing list!

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Summer Meadow

by Ryan Pancoast

A small oil study for a future book project. Watch Summer Meadow being painted here.

$150 $150

EDO now offers installment plans.
No interest for 6 months.
Just click Paypal Credit on the cart page.

Out of stock

www.odera.net
www.patreon.com/odera

Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






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Artist Interview: Bud Cook

Bud Cook creates stunning acrylic paintings, and makes portraits that almost come alive. You can spot a Bud Cook painting miles away because of the luminous color palettes and bold and sculptural brush strokes. Read our interview with Bud, as he talks to us about his works on Every Day Original, process, and his personal creative journey. You can view his entire body of work on his website or follow him on instagram.

 

artistinterview Bud Cook

1. You can always spot a Bud Cook on social media, no matter the media. Pen, pencil, coffee stains, paint, one look and “Yep, that’s Bud.” You have such a unique voice. How did you find this voice? How would you describe it to others?

 

Let me start by saying thank you for the opportunity to answer these questions – I’m honored to be asked.

I’ve struggled with this idea for a long time; arriving at a personal visual voice. I love mark making, no matter the medium – so I make and show work with a great variety of styles/approaches, and this can dilute one’s voice, at least in the eyes of the audience.  I believe our visual voice is inside of us, waiting to get out.  The more art you make, the more defined and unique your voice becomes.  Additionally, our visual voice is not concrete, for me it is an ever evolving part of my visual identity. As far as describing it, my friend Tommy Arnold described my figure paintings as a “cleverly abstracted and stylized realism”.  Simple and straight to the point, I’ll take it. 🙂

 
 

2. You have such a specific undeniable Bud Cook color palette too, but rarely the same. How do you determine what kind of colors you will use for a piece?

 

I like to work with a fairly limited palette. In college, I learned to paint with oils and had a very traditional, earthy palette – today I enjoy buying new colors that I’ve never had before, so I have a wide variety of choices to start with. I’m always working from some form of photo reference, so I let that speak to me a bit regarding how I choose my colors.  But I also like to deviate from the reference in that I tend to see colors comparatively – so while the local color in my piece may differ some from the reference, I’m comparing new colors I mix to their difference from the original color (warmer, redder, bluer, etc).  I hope that makes sense.  For example, if a shadow color looks particularly purple then I will mix a straight-up purple to start with as a base color, and then go from there as the painting progresses.  Sometimes these early colors survive through to the end because they work value-wise, if the value relationships are working throughout, then I love to leave these patches of saturated color when I can.

3. You seem to be comfortable with many different media. When starting a budcook_tereseportrait, how do you select the right media for the job?

 

With commissions, the media is largely set by the customer – and because most of the portrait work I show is acrylics – that’s what I end up using most often.  For personal work and experimental fun stuff, deciding on a medium can be based on my mood, how crazy experimental I’m feeling, whose work I have looked at recently that has blown my mind, stuff like that.  I love to play, so sometimes it’s a simple as “what do I have right here that I can paint with now”.  My studio is a mess, every new project means clean up and reorganization – not necessarily the way I’d like it to be but it’s a practical constraint.  So I may have a bunch of materials out and just decide one night to see what happens when I combine charcoal, gesso and yellow ochre with a brush and a roller.  Fun discoveries sometimes, crash and burn sometimes as well.

 
 

4. You consistently use acrylics for your paintings. What is it about the medium that resonates with you? Why not oil?

 

I learned how to paint in college using oils exclusively.  My migration to acrylics was another practical decision.  My studio is in my basement and I paint standing next to my furnace which has an open flame.  I therefore stay away from any flammable materials or anything with dangerous fumes.  Having said that, the fact is that the two mediums are just worlds apart, considering dry times, cleanup, blendability – and with the constraints of acrylics I have learned and developed new tricks over the years with the medium to achieve the look I am going for.  I would LOVE to get back to oils at some point in the future.

5. You use lots of different surfaces. Why? Do you have a favorite? When you’re going from one surface to the other, how do you think about the shift, are there rules to how you use each?

 

I mentioned earlier, I love mark-making, and different surface textures can mix with the chosen medium to produce exciting and sometimes unplanned results.  For example, when I work with canvas, the texture of that surface will play a much larger role in concert with the paint than a Masonite panel necessarily would.  I am very deliberate with what surface I choose when it comes to commissioned work, but love to experiment when making personal work or just playing.

 
 

6. What do you mutter to yourself while you paint?

 

This can get seriously weird, fast.  When things are going well, the mutterings are usually positive, but when the work goes awry, or when it is in the ugly mid-stage, that’s when the mutterings can be bad.  I try to avoid negativity as much as possible when I’m working, but when it’s all going wrong the pressure builds and I will sometimes let out a single, loud “FUCK”.  Then a concerned voice will call down to me “you okay?”, which is returned with a terse “fine”, then the pressure is gone and the corner turned.  Most often I will mutter “just keep painting, just keep painting” in the vein of Dory’s “just keep swimming”.  That keeps me on course and helps to get me through the tougher stages of a piece.

 
 

7. How do you determine what you plan to paint each month for Every Day Original?

 

So many factors weigh into that decision.  What did I sell recently on EDO, that’s a big one – or even what type of work other EDO artists are selling?  Not necessarily the subject matter, more like what size piece combined with what material, plus price.  Every time I think I’ve got the audience figured out, I’m wrong and the new piece doesn’t sell, back to the drawing board.  The object obviously is to sell, and it’s really a bit of alchemy to figure out the perfect formula of subject + medium + size + price, in order to make the sale.  Music really motivates me while I work, so I love to paint some of my favorite musicians as subjects.  And to appeal to a large audience sometimes I will pick a favorite character of mine from movies as a subject – keeps the work fun, and people can connect in personal ways to the chosen subject and the finished piece.

 
 

budcook_jp8. Does that experience bring anything to your creative voice?

 

For sure, just that fact that I have to create a new piece each month – it sounds silly but that’s a good bit of pressure right there to keep me working on new, personal stuff.  Every EDO piece is really just another personal piece, not like commissions – really just up to me what I want to paint, so it’s a great incentive to make more work, and like I mentioned previously, this helps to define that personal visual voice.

I’m assuming you use photos as reference for your work, if not then we’re ending this interview and I’m going back to evil-genius school so I can invent a brain swapper.

 
 

9. What makes you say “This one, this photo has what it takes to be a Bud Cook?”

 

Great question, important to me for sure.  Sometimes I’ll paint characters from films, a scene that was particularly poignant or that has personally affected me.  In this case I generally pick my reference carefully by making just the right screenshot from a film.  I almost never find stills directly from a Google search for this type of work, the reference has to capture the exact moment when the emotional impact is there, or when the subject is truly revealed.

When I shoot my own reference for a portrait, I’ll sometime take dozens of photos.  The selection process at that point for me quite simply is to find the shot that “is” the person, to me.  If I am doing a portrait of someone I don’t know, I will review the reference that has been sent to me and try to identify the one that I feel visually has the most personality.

I feel like the reference has to speak to me in some way in order for me to be truly engaged with the painting.  When there is a strong, personal impact from a reference photo then not only do I enjoy painting it more, but also can create a better piece in the end.

 
 

10. Why portraiture? Why not dogs or farmhouses? Did any of your past teachers/mentors help you find this focus?

 

I’ve really only been into painting portraits as personal work in the last few years.  There’s a very specific problem to solve with portraiture; get the likeness correct.  All the rest can be very personal, but first you’ve got to nail the likeness – I really enjoy that challenge.  This focus came with my first solo show in 2014, the show was titled “TRIBE – Portraits of a Community”.  I painted portraits of people in my creative tribe; peers, professors from college, mentors and a couple of my role models.  It was a good deal of pressure I put on myself, because I was painting about a dozen portraits of my painter friends.  It took a little less than a year to create the work for this show, there were about 25 pieces in the show total, but 12 of the pieces were showcased together and were all the same size. It was during this time that my style shifted to a slightly more abstracted approach with the paint and I feel like I turned a corner creatively.


 
 

11. You do killer portraits, almost sculptural in quality. The logical question here is “have you ever sculpted,” but I wonder, do you have another job other than art? Have you always?

 

I have sculpted, but just a handful of times and really just for fun.  I met a local sculptor who casts his own bronze pieces right at home and last year I started a project with his assistance, and it has been cast in bronze but has yet to be finished (never enough time for fun side-projects).  I really enjoy sculpting, but don’t have as much time to play around with this art form as much as I’d like to.

To answer the last part of that question; up until November of 2013 I worked in the corporate world as a webmaster, graphic artist and multimedia designer/developer.  I did that work for a little over 20 years and was largely creatively dormant during that time (paint-wise) – long time in the cocoon, I have wings now.

 
 

Dylan_Tangled-Up12. Could you tell us more about you? What does a typical day look like for Bud Cook? Do you just do art, or is art just part of the picture?

 

Coffee, coffee, coffee.  I teach during the school year, just one class each semester at Quinebaug Valley Community College, but it takes up a surprising amount of time.  I don’t have an organized daily schedule, though I do like to do my communications in the morning with my coffee – and a coffee sketch if I can as well!  I am a father, husband, homeowner, pet-owner, etc. – these parts of my life are integral with being an artist now that I am a self-employed freelance artist – so the key to keeping it all together is BALANCE, and that’s a constant challenge.  When I have a gallery show on the horizon, then there is a good deal of studio time in my work week.  The words “weekend” and “vacation” are not a real thing anymore, not that I’m complaining – integrating work with life is still new to me, but something that I think has way more potential for everyday happiness.  And illustration work is in there too, though I am still trying to grow my clients in that area so it’s only a small portion of my work week.

 
 

13. You paint and draw quite a few musicians. Does music play a big part in your illustration process? If you can could you describe what the soundtrack of your paintings would be?

 

I love this question, I can talk about this one all day.  Music all by itself moves me deeply – but the combination of music and paint can transport me to another state of mind.  There’s no way I could describe a soundtrack of what I listen to, it’s so all over the place.  Music is a vehicle for me, it takes anxiety away and can turn a sour mood around 180 degrees.  When a specific musician’s work affects me, I feel a strange connection to that person – like they know something about me, or that we have similar life experiences that make their work so relatable for me.
Lyrics especially move me, so I am a fan of the “singer-songwriter: Dylan, Mark Knopfler, Jackson Browne, Natalie Merchant, Indigo Girls, Neil Young, Cat Stevens, Colin Hay, I can’t possibly name enough artists here.  Music as mood is important too, so am I looking to be uplifted while I paint, or do I need a darker louder vibe, or do I need someone to really burn me down?  The voice, oh man, this is the one that can really send me; Eddie Vedder, Sinéad O’Connor, Chris Cornell, Dolores O’Riordan, Greta Svabo Bech, I seriously can’t begin to mention enough names.  I can go on and on – let it suffice that music is transcendent for me.

 
 

14. Favorite Album and why.

 

Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” got me through the high school years; still love that album to this day. Pearl Jam has been my groove since their arrival on the music scene, so final answer; probably Pearl Jam’s “Ten”.

 
 

15. Here’s a broad question, where are you taking your work? Where is it going next year, five years, ten?

 

I’m excited to announce that I just recently signed a contract with an Illustration Agency; Sullivan Moore – and I am looking forward to growing my illustration client list with their help.

I’d like to move toward doing more gallery work.  I’m in a 3-man show in September at Krab Jab Studio in Seattle, and another 2-man show next spring in Massachusetts.  Alas, the gallery work is wonderful to have, but doesn’t necessarily represent any income – and can even at times mean a loss – but it’s the work that is most my own, so most enjoyable to create.

Paint-wise, I have grandiose ideas about where I’d like to take my work, but it’s never real until I put the brush to the surface.  My latest work for the upcoming Krab Jab show is a bit of a departure from my work to date – I’m intrigued with where the work is taking me.

budcook_geisha-5

 
 

16. Where else other than EDO can people find your work? And buy it?

 

As I mentioned in the previous answer, I will be in a 3-man show at Krab Jab Studio in Seattle this September, with new paintings that I am currently working on.  I also show my work in a local gallery near my home in Northeast Connecticut; the Silver Circle Gallery (http://www.silvercirclegallery.com/).  I don’t have a store on my website (http://www.budcookstudio.com/), but always welcome inquiries about purchasing work that appears on the site. My basement is FULL of unsold work, so really any work that I’ve posted on social media or my website may be available.


 
 

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Curator’s Picks

Did You Miss These?

We have had another exceptional month at EDO with lots of new members on our mailing list and lots of new collectors picking up great pieces. Here are some more of our favorite pieces from the past few weeks, three pieces that are definitely worth a second look! First, be sure to check out Jeremy Wilson’s oil painting, Queen of Bialya, with its gorgeous orange color palette and interplay of painterly and graphic brush strokes. Next up we a compelling and haunting graphite drawing from Travis Lewis, entitled “Put Your Demons Behind You”. And last but not least, we have the continuation of David Palumbo’s “Monochrome Woman on Red” series.

And if you want to make sure you don’t miss anything, sign up for our mailing list!

 



Curator’s Picks

Did You Miss These?

We have had another exceptional month at EDO with lots of new members on our mailing list and lots of new collectors picking up great pieces. Here are some more of our favorite pieces from the past few weeks, three pieces that are definitely worth a second look! First, be sure to check out Kristina Carroll’s blue and golden goddess, Nyx. Next up we a compelling and romantic piece from Jennifer Hrabota-Lesser, entitled “Kiss”. And last but not least, an Elven color pastel portrait, “Evangeline” from the one and only Ashly Lovett.

And if you want to make sure you don’t miss anything, sign up for our mailing list!

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Nyx

by Kristina Carroll

5 x 7

Oil and Gold Leaf on illustration board

$375

View more process videos and tutorials on my Youtube channel.

$375 $375

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Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






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Kiss

by Jennifer Hrabota-Lesser

$250 $250

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In stock

www.odera.net
www.patreon.com/odera

Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






RECENT WORK

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Evangeline

by Ashly Lovett

“This is the forest primeval.”

 

EDO now offers installment plans.
No interest for 6 months.
Just click Paypal Credit on the cart page.

www.odera.net
www.patreon.com/odera

Odera Igbokwe is an illustrator and painter located in Vancouver, BC by way of Brooklyn, NY. Odera loves to explore storytelling through Afro-diasporic mythologies, black resilience, and magical girl transformation sequences. Their work alchemizes color, movement, and queer magic to weave together ancient narratives with afrofuturist visions. You can also find Odera as manager of Every Day Original, curating and collaborating on zines, or combo-breaking the internet.






RECENT WORK

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Artist Interview : Stephanie Inagaki

Stephanie Inagaki creates hauntingly beautiful black and white drawings collaged with Washi Paper. Join us, as we delve into her world, offering insight into her fascination with Ravens and Crows, and how she alchemizes her multidisciplinary art into her own distinct vision.

You can view her entire body of work on her website or follow her on instagram.
Stephanie Inagaki interview
1. You describe yourself as a multidisciplinary artist, could you tell us about each of those disciplines and the type of work you do?
I have two full time careers being a fine artist and metalsmith which is under the company name, Miyu Decay. I have both my BFA and MFA in Sculpture but my career path has led me to predominately create drawings. I would love to get back into large scale sculptures but it’s been difficult finding galleries for that. (I’m putting the word out there universe!) My sculptures and drawings have always been influenced by personal experiences. There has been quite a bit of trauma so making art is the best way to synthesize those moments from my life. I also make my own costuming as I have been a Middle Eastern dancer for almost half my life and performing necessitated costumes. I sell some of my costume headdresses and fascinators through my jewelry company.  My jewelry is a mixture of the macabre, Old World, and tribal. Most of my pieces are originally hand carved.
2. What does the typical work day look like for Stephanie Inagaki?
Coffee is the first thing that gets made every day! My mornings are spent answering emails, on my social media, and working out. Lunch generally happens next and then I get into the studio for the rest of the day. I usually only focus on one thing at a time so it’s split between spending the day working on jewelry orders or drawings for upcoming shows. I take breaks in the afternoon to tend to my garden and play with my zoo menagerie. My boyfriend already had an older white cat, Cotton. When we moved in together we rescued two kitten sisters (Cowboy and Bebop) and two puppy sisters (Klaus and Nomi.)
3. We hear, and even recommend, specialization. Focus your work, break through, then expand. Did you do this? Why or why not? If not, how did you make it work?
I certainly feel focused but I don’t necessarily think I’ve broken through yet, conceptually or careerwise. It has just felt like a constant uphill battle with slight plateaus of regularity. I’ll feel like I’ve broken through to some extent when I don’t have to worry about monthly bills. Then onto the next part of this massive mountain! Being a creative as a career is difficult but so rewarding in many different ways. It feeds the soul. I am humbled that I can do this full time and that there are people who appreciate my work. I can’t thank my friends and loved ones enough because this isn’t easy.
I do agree to some extent in specialization as some days I feel like I wish I could just make fine art. But then I end up missing metalsmithing. I’ve always had my hand in many pots! I do specialize within each discipline though.
Stephanie Inagaki 1
4. How do these disciplines influence the sort of art you do for EDO?
I love the Old World. I amalgamate vintage and antique fabrics, patterns, and jewelry pieces that come from around that world for my costuming that I sell an also incorporate those patterns into the jewelry I sculpt. Since I was buying vintage kimono fabrics, it was a natural transition to buy washi paper that has similar patterning.
5. You’re very active, and open on social media. How do you approach social media like instagram and facebook? Do they each serve a purpose?
I had initially kept my Miyu Decay jewelry, art, and personal life separate on social media but I am all those things so I find that it’s important that I integrate it, especially since I am my own brand. It all defines who I am and the kind of artwork that I create. By seeing who the creator is, it makes the work more accessible and personable. I’m naturally introverted so having social media has helped me connect with other artists that I admire and respect. I don’t think I would have had the guts to approach them in person. Because of this, I make effort in answering any comments on both social platforms.
6. Do you consciously balance the personal vs professional shares you make?Inagaki_Tempest
For the most part I do. The only completely private social media account I have is my personal Facebook profile. I’ll repost silly animal gifs or social and political posts on that one. My professional art page on Facebook mainly has posts about my art, jewelry, and exhibitions that I am in. Instagram encompasses my career and personal life. It’s been more streamlined in that sense.
7. Do you have a general strategy about what to post and when? How did you come to this?
I loosely follow the weekly hashtags like #tbt or #fbf to post older works or detailed crops since not everyone who follows my work has seen it. It’s good for the numbers to be consistently posting as well. I’ve done some research as to what time is best to post too but occasionally it will be sporadic. I tend to be working Friday nights and those posts get a lot of views surprisingly.
8. A lot of your work on EDO features ravens and crows, what draws you to them and their mythology?
They are brilliantly fantastic creatures. One of my past residences had a murder of crows that would always hang out in the parking lot by my house. I’d talk to them and they’d talk back. Sometimes they would sit on my chimney and I’d heard them cackling through the hole, leaving a warm fuzzy feeling inside my heart. I love that they mainly mate for life. If a human or another animal does something good or bad, they’re intelligent enough to tell their murder for subsequent generations about those deeds. They represent love and loyalty to me. Crows and ravens, being carrions by nature are directly associated to death. I’ve always seen life and death as cyclical so death isn’t necessarily a negative thing because it leads back to growth and renewal.
9. I’ve noticed some of your pieces focus on Japanese lore (Ningyo, Nami,) and then use materials like Washi paper. Could you tell us more about that context and relationship to Japan and how it affects your work?
Since I’ve been creating my own mythology with my self portraiture I was looking to find other influences in my life that I could draw from. Harkening back to my cultural roots seemed like the most natural step since my parents are from Japan. I grew up watching Miyazaki films and other Japanese TV programs that always involved myth and folklore. I watched a lot of horror and sci-fi because my parents never censored what my brother and I wanted to watch. It was great.
On a design standpoint, there is always something so graceful about washi paper design. I use a lot of negative space in my drawings and I find that washi paper can act the same way. I was taught by a traditional paper seller how to sculpt flowers when I told her that I meticulously cut out the patterns but I have yet to make the flowers myself. I love the subtly in the golds of the printed flowers and flatness in color that contrasts my stark black and white drawings.
Ver10. On your website you mention returning to your roots in LA, studying abroad in Italy, and living in various US cities. How has this travelling influenced your outlook creatively and personally?
I think everyone needs to travel and see the world. Studying abroad should be a requirement while in school. I was able to live in different parts of our vast country and experience the unique histories that comes along with each city. It was the same abroad. I learned foreign languages which allows a person to understand the world in another conceptual lens other than English. I was able to see incredible art pieces in person that has forever changed me.
11. Favorite restaurant in the world and why.
Union in Pasadena, CA. My boyfriend, David took us there last year for our anniversary. It’s now been our go to for special occasions. Everything is freshly made and delectable, the service is always fantastic, and the biggest plus side is that they’re extremely careful about his food allergies. He can even have their desserts! They have the best meatballs that are perfectly crisp but succulent on the inside.
12. LA is a hotbed of great artists, too many to list here, and you are friends with many of them. Do you ever work with, or even near them? Tell us more about that, and what it brings to you and your work.
I’m generally solitary when it comes to working but occasionally I will take my drawings with me to work at friends’ studios. It simultaneously works as a time to catch up but still be productive as everyone tends to be on deadlines. Mind you, I can only do this with a few friends! It’s a bit reminiscent of art school where I had to share studio spaces with friends and colleagues. I am fortunate enough to have a solid group of creative friends that I can still get similar feedback from.
Collaboratively I’ve worked with Allan Amato on his Temple of Art project and a few other subsequent drawings for myself that came out of that process. Integrating his photography into my work opened up a whole new creative language for me to not only collage with Japanese washi paper, but to add acrylic and watercolor into my predominantly black and white charcoal world.
13. What is your process like for creating your pieces for EDO? (How much is spontaneous vs planned? How do you choose a subject matter? How do you determine pricing? How and when do you share what you’re working on?)
I do a fair amount of driving since my parents live close by, but far enough that it warrants an hour drive one way. My framer and printer, Museum Quality Framing is also in my hometown where my parents live. I usually think of my EDO drawings on these drives. It’s really meditative for me and when I’m having a creative rut, these drives help me focus in. My drawings are planned. My sketches are extremely rough but I tend to have a solid idea of the composition. I think I’m more spontaneous with placing the washi paper.
Each of my EDO drawings are tiny visual phrases of my overall themes of life/death and living, which involves feeling love and pain. I feel like I still have a lot to explore with integrating color and washi paper so I tend to still focus on crows or folklore.
My pricing is usually determined by the size, but if I spend more time and detailing on a similarly sized piece, I will raise the price.
I’ll share details of my EDO drawings when I work on them which can be the week before or even a few weeks prior to my release date depending on when I feel inspired or have the time. They are shared on IG and Facebook.
14. Any final thoughts for our readers?
Thank you for taking the time and interest in my interview and work. I can’t do it without you all!
 stephanie inagaki 2